Great Places To Camp, Part Two

Without further ado, here’s the next three places on our list of great places to camp.  If you missed the last article somehow you can find it here, or if you don’t have time here’s our quick list of great camping spots.

Part One

Part Two

And on with the list…


Patonga Camping Grounds – New South Wales

How far is it?

These camping grounds are around one and a half hours from Sydney and only 25 km from Gosford, so still quite close to civilisation. Patonga is a small town with all the regular pubs and shops meaning this trip can be as rough or glamorous as you’d like it to be.

patonga aerial pic2
Image courtesy of Gosford City Council

Accessibility

You’ll be able to drive right in and set up camp after you’ve made your booking. The campground offers powered and unpowered sites which means you can bring along those essentials like a kettle or electric stovetop rather than rely on the communal barbeque if you’d prefer. There’s also amenities for everyone so the kids don’t have an excuse to be dirty every night. You might have poor reception on the grounds so if you’ve got important business try to take care of it before leaving, otherwise you’ll be running back and forth between the town just for those extra bars.

patonga_creek[1].jpg
Image Courtesy of Gosford City Council
What to do?

The campground as tennis courts if you’re looking to practice your swings and serves which you can book in advance.  There’s also boats available for hire or you could catch a ferry up to Palm Beach and spend the day on the waves and sand building an epic sand castle.  If you’d prefer to stay dry there are also bushwalks you could take to explore the area and get a good view of the coast from Waratah Lookout.

patonga pano pic.JPG
Image courtesy of Gosford City Council


Wilsons Promontory – Victoria

How far is it?

Wilsons Promontory is a huge area that’s very open to camping with multiple campgrounds available.  Depending on where you go it could take close to 2.5 hours driving from Melbourne to arrive. Traffic allowing, it should be an easy drive over the main highways.

Image courtesy of Parks Victoria
Image courtesy of Parks Victoria

Accessibility

Tidal River campground is easily accessible, having the main road through the park take you right to it. The last stop for petrol on your way into the park is Yanakie so make sure you fill up to make the return trip as easy as possible. There are also other camping locations that you can hike to if you want a more adventurous trip.  Campgrounds have toilets and you’ll have a great view from the south-most area of mainland Australia.

Image courtesy of Parks Victoria
Image courtesy of Parks Victoria

What to do?

There’s plenty of hiking to be found in the promontory, ranging from short walks down the river to overnight hikes to the eastern beach and lighthouse point.  If you fancy a swim at Squeaky Beach make sure to bring your wetsuit because it can get quite chilly that far south, but that doesn’t take away from the view you’ll be rewarded with. In a truly beautiful part of the world you’d better bring your camera too!

Image courtesy of Parks Victoria
Image courtesy of Parks Victoria


Freycinet National Park – Tasmania

How far is it?

The national park is about two and a half hours drive from Hobart or Launceston and should be an easy drive in along the coast. There are plenty of places to stay around the Freycinet Peninsula so don’t hesitate to do a little exploring around the local area.

Image courtesy of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service.
Image courtesy of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service.

Accessibility

With the easy drive in you’ll have no troubles arriving at your destination.  The largest hurdle will be booking a spot.  The national park campgrounds are so popular they hold a ballot to allocate spaces that is drawn in August each year, so it’s worth having a backup plan. With the beach right nearby though it’s worth getting excited over if you do make the cut.

Image courtesy of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service.
Image courtesy of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service.

What to do?

On the peninsular there’s plenty of bush activities for you to do like hiking. If you’re up for a challenge you could do the 3 day hike over the length of the Freycinet Peninsula.  You’ll have a great view for bird watching too once you get to the coast and might even be able to spot a Black Browed Albatross.  If you’d prefer to take it easy there’s plenty of road for a scenic drive to one of the lookouts for a great view over the park and the ocean.  

Freycinet-NP-water
Image courtesy of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service.

Go Out and Camp!

There’s a quick run down of a great place for each state that hopefully everyone can get to.  This isn’t the best place in each state, just a really good one, and we tried to show off different kinds of places so that you could see the variety.  There’s going to be way more places and way more adventures for you to have than could be covered in this post so go out there and make some memories.

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