How To Choose: Pointes

Pointe shoes are dance shoes which are rigid, in contrast to demi-pointes, which are softer. A great deal of work is required before starting out with pointe shoes: a dancer must have good experience on demi-pointes, and strong ankles. A dancing instructor is best able to judge if a student is ready to start using pointe shoes. A dance teacher is vital for learning good technique and correcting mistakes. Without having learned the necessary basics, a dancer can risk injury and may never be able to wear pointes again.

A dancer should try on pointe shoes while wearing pointe guards, in order to find the right size. If these are not available, pointe shoes should be slightly larger than your usual shoe size, to allow space for the point guards. When on point, the foot should be stretched out inside the shoe, which should not fit too tightly (the toes should not be splayed or overlapping). To find the right length, stand on point. You should be able to pinch the skin between your fingers at the heel (about 0.5cm).

pointes

Recommended for beginners, and thanks to their wide box, pointe shoes are suited to all types of foot and aid the passage from demi-pointe to pointe.

Maintenance Tips

  • Be sure to dry your shoes properly, especially between lessons. The best thing is to alternate between two pairs of pointe shoes. While working, your foot warms up, and the moisture will affect your shoes’ lifespan.
  • To protect your feet, there is nothing better than using pointe guards and blister patches. To prevent blisters or misshapen toes, be careful not to wear shoes that are too small.

Keep these tips in mind when choosing from the range of dance shoes at Decathlon and you’ll be able to dance comfortably in your new pointes.

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